The 411 on Boston with kids. Photo by Pixabay.

The 411 on Boston with Kids

Boston is chock full of American history, and I don’t mean the boring kind. You can feel it on the cobblestones under your feet and taste it in a bowl of authentic New England clam chowder. From Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride to the Boston Tea Party, Boston is alive with the kind of historical and literary past that speaks to children. And the best part about visiting Boston with kids is that you can do most of it on foot without overdoing it with the museum visits, which can easily turn into family death-marches after a couple of days.  It helps that Boston is so easy to navigate on foot, although some of the cobble-stoned and brick sidewalks in the historical section can be a challenge with a stroller.

Below are some suggestions to help you get the most of your family trip to Boston, with plenty of history and plenty of play time, a classic hotel that is sure to keep the kids on their best behavior(!), and a great spot to enjoy clam chowder in a historical setting.

Activity 1: Play in the Country’s Oldest City Park

Boston Common is the oldest city park in the United States.
Boston Common is the oldest city park in the United States.

Boston Common is the oldest public park in the United States. Through the years, it has served as a British Redcoats encampment, an anti-slavery meeting place, and a World War I Victory garden. Today, it’s a wonderful place to take a little break from the city and spend a lovely afternoon with the kids.

A perennial family favorite, the Frog Pond is a splash/spray pool in the summer and is transformed into a small ice-skating rink in the winter. With a nearby carousel and the excellent Tadpole Playground within arm’s reach, you could plan on spending hours here. And don’t miss the park’s most famous attraction, the Make Way for Ducklings statue, based on the beloved children’s book by Walter McCloskey about a family of ducklings that makes its home in Boston’s Public Garden. Website: www.boston.gov/parks/boston-common

Activity 2: Set Sail on the USS Constitution

USS Consititution in Boston
“Old Ironsides” herself can still be boarded in Boston Harbor.

Built during the birth of the United States and named by George Washington himself, the USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy. Its colorful history includes fighting pirates off the Barbary Coast and defeating four British frigates during the War of 1812. Her nickname, Old Ironsides, attests to this ship’s unsinkable legend. A Navy crew mans the ship and also serves as interpretive guides during your visit, sharing tales of the ship’s fascinating history.

The USS Constitution Museum, also on site, has plenty of hands-on exhibits to keep little ones entertained and older ones and their parents informed. Website: www.navy.mil/local/constitution/visitors.asp

Note: Visiting hours are limited so check the website for a full schedule. Admission to the ship is free and there is a suggested donation for the museum. You will need to show ID and have your bags checked for entrance.

Activity 3: Play Indoors at the Boston Children’s Museum

boston children's museum
No trip to Boston with Kids is complete without a visit to the Boston Children’s Museum.

History is great but sometimes, especially in the cold depths of winter or during a summer heat wave, you need to get the kids indoors to expend some energy. The Boston Children’s Museum is the second oldest children’s museum in the country and is definitely one of the best.

Pssst! Don’t miss the map of our Boston recommendations and pinnable at the end of this feature.

Kids find plenty of ways to get the wiggles out, from the indoor “skating” area, which takes sock-skating to the next level, to a huge climbing structure. You’ll also want to spend time exploring the various theme rooms found throughout the museum’s three floors. The construction room is always a hit as is the Japanese house, a two-story hundred-year-old merchant’s house from Kyoto.

Try to visit first thing in the morning on a week day. It gets crowded on weekends and holidays. Website: www.bostonchildrensmuseum.org

Tip: If you have a membership to your local children’s museum that has reciprocal admission privileges (many do), you may be able to get in free of charge.

Activity 4: Stroll Through History on the Freedom Trail

Exploring the historic Freedom Trail on a trip to Boston with Kids.
Exploring the historic Freedom Trail on a trip to Boston with Kids.

The beautiful thing about the Freedom Trail—a  two and a half-mile trail that illustrates the history of the American Revolutionary War—is that you can get a really good feel for the times and events of that pivotal point in history without having to spend much time indoors (perfect for a fair-weather visit to Boston with kids). You could do the Trail in one day under ideal conditions or opt to split it into several days.

Since you will no doubt begin the day with a family reading of Henry Wadsworth Longellow’s historical poem “Paul Revere’s Ride,” then head to the Old North Church and Paul Revere’s House, two highlights of the Freedom Trail both located in Boston’s North End. Old North Church is where Paul Revere famously signaled “one if by land, and two if by sea.” Across the street from the church, Paul Revere’s house, built in 1680, is the oldest standing structure in Boston, and where he lived with his family when he took his famous midnight ride.

Also of particular interest to kids is America’s first public school, Boston Latin School; and the “who’s who” of Boston cemeteries, Granary Burial Ground, where Benjamin Franklin’s parents, Paul Revere, Samuel Adams, and all the Boston Massacre victims are laid to rest. Website: www.thefreedomtrail.org

Tip: Download a map of the freedom trail to plan out your route. https://www.thefreedomtrail.org/freedom-trail/maps.shtml

1 Great Place to Stay: Loews Boston Hotel

Location, location, former police station? Loews Boston Hotel.
Location, location, former police station? Loews Boston Hotel.

A former police department headquarters (make sure you tell the kids to be on their best behavior), Loews Boston Hotel is a crisply-renovated hotel in a classic building. It’s in a great location, just a five-minute walk to Back Bay Station and five minutes from the Public Garden and Boston Common. They offer adjoining rooms, fabulous bathrooms, and free coffee in the lobby. Check out the Loews Loves Kids program during your visit, through which you can request to borrow a stroller, car seat, and toys, and, for older kids, a lending library of video and board games and a guide of teen-friendly local activities and shopping. Website: https://www.loewshotels.com/boston-hotel

1 Great Place to Eat: “Chowda” and Chocolate Chips at Faneuil Hall Marketplace

chowda on at Boston's 18th Century Faneuil Hall.
Get your “chowda” on at Boston’s 18th Century Faneuil Hall.

You may find that you return to Faneuil Hall again and again during your visit to Boston. The wide range of choices in this massive food hall pretty much guarantees the kids will find something they want to eat and you won’t be stuck eating pizza at every meal. And it is in a historical site (OK, that one isn’t much of a reach—you are in Boston, after all). Faneuil Hall was built in 1742 and was the site of many of the nation’s famous speeches, including those of Frederick Douglass and Samuel Adams.

When in Boston, you’ll need to try Boston clam chowder and Boston Chowda Company serves one of the best. You can also get Maine lobsta—I mean lobster—rolls, New England pot pies, and sandwiches and wraps. And since you’re in the great food court that is Faneuil Hall, dessert is only steps away. Don’t miss the scrumptious chocolate chip cookies at the Chipyard. Website: www.bostonchowda.com and www.chipyard.com

Map of Our Recommendations:

You’ll find many more recommendations that may be of interest on our Massachusetts Family Travel board on Pinterest.

Pinnable for Your Trip Planning:

The 411 on Boston with Kids
The 411 on Boston with Kids
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Veronique Autphenne

Véronique Autphenne grew up on three different continents and has had a passion for travel ever since she can remember. She has settled in Alexandria, VA, and still travels as often as possible with her husband John and three boys. She started Pax Travel Design to help busy families realize their travel dreams while staying sane in the process. Vero runs the blog, Belgium with Kids, wrote the e-book Brussels with Kids, and co-founded All Over the Map. Follow her on Twitter: @veroautphenne and on Facebook: Pax Travel Design. Her favorite moments, both on the road and at home, tend to involve food, family, and lots of laughter.
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